Iceland Personal Tours
E-mail: info@icelandpersonaltours.is
Tel: +354 864 2268
 
Private Tours | Group Excursions| Local Guides | Airport Pickup & Drop Off | 24 Hours Customer Service 
BLOG FROM ICELAND

PHOTOS FROM OUR LATEST TOURS
20 November 2017

Pictures from our latest tours around Iceland. If you are interested in our private tours send us your thoughts at info@icelandpersonaltours.is


  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  9. Managing Director
  10. Managing Director
  11. Managing Director
  12. Managing Director
  13. Managing Director
  14. Managing Director
  15. Managing Director
  16. Managing Director
  17. Managing Director
  18. Managing Director

PHOTO MEMORY FROM SNAEFELLSNES
5 May 2017

Photographs allows you to re-live some of your best moments in live. I was going through my winter shots and saw this one and it took me straight back to the moment when I was at this abandoned place in Snaefelsnes. I still remember how the snowy storm was. It was so blind that I often could not see the road I was driving. This day I was guiding a woman from Brazil and her daughter and I still remember how stunned they were by this weather we got. Maybe they were not as excited as I was with the weather but I loved every minute of it. I hope that my guiding  at www.icelandpersonaltours.is create more memories like this one.

Snæfellsnes peninsula in West Iceland is almost a miniature version of the island. In addition to its characteristic Snæfellsjökull glacier, there are black sandy beaches, bird cliffs, spectacular mountains and volcanic craters along with small villages along the coast. This is a place any nature lover needs to visit
  
  
  
Check out these tours:

- THE WONDERS OF SNAEFELLSNES - Day Tour

-
SOUTH ICELAND AND THE WONDERS OF SNAEFELLSNES

​-
SOUTH COAST AND SNAEFELLSNES - EXPRESS

PICTURE IN SPOTLIGHT - REYNISDRANGAR
3 May 2017

One of the place I always go to on my South Coast day tours or my trips around the south area of Iceland is Reynisfjara black beach. This is a place that is always interesting. I been there so many times that I have stopped counting but I always find something new and interesting. This composition is one of my favourites where you can see the basalt cliffs of mount Reynisfjall and you can see the Reynisdrangar cliffs standing tall out of the sea. Legend says that the stacks originated when two trolls dragged a three-master ship to land unsuccessfully and when daylight broke they became needles of rock.
 
When there is a low tight at the beach you can walk straight to the basalt sea stacks of Reynisdrangar and take a selfie of you facing the cliffs. If there is a high tide than you will witness some massive waves reaching far up the shore that it can be dangerous to stand on the beach and people need to be careful.
 
The black beach is close to the village of Vik and the cliffs can be seen from many other angles. You can see them clearly from the peninsula of Dyrhólaey and it is always interesting to take shot of them from the Víkurkirkja church in Vík.
 
This is one of the must visit places in Iceland, it takes you around 2 hour to get to it from Reykjavík. If you like to visit this place with me than consider taking a day tour with me as your driver guide or lets include this in a multi-day package. 
  
Check out these tours:

- SOUTH COAST ADVENTURE - Day Tour

-
SOUTH ICELAND AND THE WONDERS OF SNAEFELLSNES

​-
SOUTH ICELAND COMPLETE

MY TOUR WITH NATHALIE AND TOM
14 - 20 April 2017

I was just finishing off a 7 day / 6 nights tour and wanted to tell you the itinerary that was packed and we had a wonderful time.

On day 1 the 14th of April I picked up Nathalie and her 19 year old son Tom at Keflavik airport in the afternoon and dropped the of their first overnight stay here in Reykjavik.

On day 2 I picked them up at 09:30 and we did the golden circle tour where we visit Þingvellir, Geysir, Gullfoss, Skálholt and the volcanic crater of Kerið. After that we drove to the lovely village of Eyrarbakki and had a dinner in the town of Selfoss. After our dinner we head to our overnight stay not far from Selfoss.

On day 3 we had a full active day on the south coast where we first stopped at Seljalandsfoss where we walked behind the waterfall, after that we went wearing water boots to the waterfall canyon of Gljúfrabúi. From there we visit the mighty Skógafoss and got a bit of shower from the waterfall. After that shower we drove to Dyrólaey and had a fantastic overview of the south coast and next we stopped at Kirkjufjara to see Arnardrangur cliff. From there we stopped at Reynisfjara and walked to the Reynisdrangar cliffs and sit on the rocks facing the stunning cliffs. After that wonderful visit we went to Vik and took some photos from the church before we went to visit Víkurfjara and then to have a dinner at Halldórskaffi. After the dinner we drove to Kirkjubæjarklaustur for our overnight stay with a quick stop at Eldhraun.

On day 4 we woke up early had a breakfast and then head our way, our first stop was at Skaftafell where we made the walk up to Svartifoss waterfall, after the nice walk we drove to Sólheimajökull and took some photos of the glacier rift. From there we drove to Fjallárslón and got some close up shot of the Vatnajökull glacier. After that wonderful visit we went to Jökulsárslón and the diamond beach of Breiðamerkursandur to get a close up shots of the glacier ice rocks. From there we drove back to Kirkjubæjarklaustur, had a dinner and then to sleep.

On day 5 we drove back to Reykjavik from Kirkjubæjarklaustur. On the way we stopped at fjaðrárgljúfur canyon, from there we stopped at Eldhraun to visit this stunning lava area. After that we drove on and went to Hjörleifshöfði and took some photos around Mýrdalssandur. From there we kept on going and made our final stop at the black beach at Sólheimasandur where we walked to the abandoned DC plane stuck on the black sand. After that visit we drove straight back to Reykjavik.

On day 6 the mother and son had a day off in Reykjavik but I picked them up at 18:00 and we had a 2 and a half our visit at Reykjanes where we went to Krýsuvík, Seltjörn, Gunnuhver, the lighthouse of Reykjanesviti and witnessed the stunning waves on the tip of Reykjanes, next to cliff Valahnúkur. We ended the evening with a relaxing time at the Blue Lagoon.

Day 7. After our relaxing time at the Blue Lagoon we drove back to Reykjavik for few hours of sleep before I picked them up in the middle of night for their early flight back to Luxembourg. This was a very nice time and I had a wonderful time showing them the southern part of Iceland. We took lots of photos, I specially focused on helping Tom to get the best photos he could along with taking photos of my guests. This is a great tour and I am all in on treading my guests as my friends and showing them how you can see Iceland at its best. I truly believe that going on a private tour with me is one of the best ways to experience Iceland with a local and friendly Icelandic guide.

  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. BLOG FROM ICELAND
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  9. Managing Director
  10. BLOG FROM ICELAND
  11. Managing Director
  12. BLOG FROM ICELAND
  13. Managing Director
  14. Managing Director
  15. Managing Director

MIDNIGHT SUN IN ICELAND
26 May 2016

Sunset photography captures the quiet moments of peace when the world is settling down to sleep; quiet, vast, and always beautiful. Sunset or sundown is the daily disappearance of the sun below the western horizon as a result of earth’s rotation. Sunsets can be different each time and you can always see something unique in them. To look at a summer sunset is for me similar to looking at a beautiful painting.

When is the sunset/midnight sun

Iceland is famed for its sunsets and long days during summertime (from May to late August) which peaks with the summer solstice on 20th of June (the longest day of summer) when the sun sets just after midnight and rises again just before 3 am. Further north of the country like in the city of Akureyri the day will be even longer.  

The slow sunsets during the summertime produce incredible displays of colorful skies that can last for hours. The sunrise is set the only a couple of hours later so for around 3 months during the summer, Iceland has bright nights. The sunlight will though get shorter from just a few seconds up to several minutes per day after June 20th. For me, one of the best times for sunset photography is late in August when there are a couple of pitch black nights that gives you the opportunity to get really dark and interesting red sunsets.

Late night photographing in Iceland​​

Having nearly 24 hours of light during the summer in Iceland gives you a great opportunity to go sightseeing later in the day. So taking the advantages of these late nights are a must do if you come to photograph in Iceland. Popular places in Iceland have fewer travelers during evenings and late nights and are therefore a great time to visit if you want to have more space and time on your own. Interesting sunset subjects can be for example seashores around Iceland, mountains, waterfalls, ice lagoons, sculptures, and lava fields.

Places to consider capturing during sunset or the midnight sun:

  • The seashore close to the island of Grotta in the Reykjavik capital area
  • The sculpture Sun Voyager in Reykjavik
  • Mountains like Vestrahorn, Hafnarfjall, and Kirkjufell
  • Jokulsarslon ice lagoon
  • Hvítarserkur cliff
  • Waterfalls like Seljalandsfoss, Skogafoss, Brúarfoss and Godafoss
  • Lava fields like in Reykjanes peninsula
  • Many lighthouses around Iceland and the house Straumur art center at Straumsvik

If you are staying in Reykjavik it is ideal to leave the city around dinner time and take the so-called Golden Circle Tour which includes Geysir, Gullfoss, and Thingvellir.

The settings

To capture the sunset in the best way you need to be at the right place at the right time, sharp focus in a low light with aperture settings of f/2.8 is recommended. You will then need to change the ISO and exposure settings to get the best result. ISO should be set at 100 but the exposure needs to be adjusted based on the condition outside, not too fast and not too slow either. An exposure setting from 60 up to 200 usually works but you have to adjust it based on how bright or dark it is outside. Remember to shoot in RAW which allows you to change the white balance in your post processing work.

Remember that though it is bright outside the weather often can be chilly so dress accordingly. Tripod is not necessary though it is always recommended to have one, along with extra batteries. It can get dark really fast during the early and late summer so a flashlight can get in handy.

Conclusion

  • Sunsets happens late in the evening during the summer
  • The longest day of summer 2016 is June 20th
  • It is recommended to have aperture settings of f/2.8
  • You have to adjust the exposure setting based on how bright/dark it is outside
  • The sunset itself can be quick so be at the right place at the right time but you have nearly 24 hours of light
  • Iceland is ideal place to photograph late in the evenings and night during summer
  • If you are staying in Reykjavik consider taking the Golden Circle Tour in the evening to experience more peaceful and quiet atmosphere with fewer crowds.
  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. MIDNIGHT SUN IN ICELAND
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  9. Managing Director
  10. MIDNIGHT SUN IN ICELAND
  11. Managing Director
  12. MIDNIGHT SUN IN ICELAND
  13. Managing Director
  14. Managing Director
  15. Managing Director

HOW TO CAPTURE NORTHERN LIGHTS
23 March 2016

During the winter time, many people travel to the northern hemisphere to photograph the Northern Lights, also known as aurora borealis. The best time to capture the stunning lights is from September to mid-April – these are the months where there are full dark nights.

The northern lights are the result of electrically charged particles from the sun colliding with gaseous particles in the Earth’s atmosphere, causing displays of bright, colorful dancing lights. They are visible in the magnetic polar regions of the northern and southern hemispheres and they can range in color from white, green, pink and purple. In the northern hemisphere, the lights are best seen from Iceland, Greenland, Norway, Siberia, Canada and Alaska.


To get some great shots of the Northern Lights planning is important

Dark Skies
Without dark skies it is very hard to get nice shots of the Northern Lights, so finding the right dark spot is crucial in your haunt. Blue Marble Light Pollution Map is a great tool to find those dark locations across the northern hemisphere.

Clear skies
You need to be in darkness but without clear sky, it will be hard to get good shots of the Northern Lights so to capture the aurora you need to find some clear skies. MeteoStar Weather Satellite Imagery Maps of the Northern Hemisphere does a great job of showing cloud cover conditions on a large scale.

Aurora Activity
When you have found a dark place with a clear sky you need to check the aurora activity in the sky. The activity is measured on the Kp scale which ranges from 0-9 with 0 being low aurora activity and 9 being the greatest. Aurora Forecast Page provides some great insight on the current aurora forecast and a multi-day outlook. Aurora activity from 3 to 5 is a very good for some great Northern Lights shots. It is necessary to have in mind that aurora activity can be very unpredictable and some days are better than others.

What kinds of gear do a need?

To capture the Northern Lights a full frame (35mm or larger sensor) camera and a wide angle lens is ideal.

Here a few tips you need to have in mind

  • Bring a tripod with you.
  • Use a camera with manual mode. You will need to be able to adjust the ISO, Aperture and Exposure time.
  • A full frame camera with high ISO capability allows you to capture the Northern Lights without significant noise in your images.
  • Wide angle lens (14-24mm range) with a fast aperture. Aperture settings of f/2.8-f/4 are recommend.
  • Fully charged battery. In the cold batteries die quickly so be aware of that.

Settings

Since the Northern lights are far away up in the space we can focus at infinity and obtain sharp focus. It is good to set up your camera during the day and adjust your lens to focus on infinity, or at a faraway horizon. Place your focus on manual to get the right focus in low light.

To capture the best images of the Northern Lights, shoot in RAW which allows you to change the white balance in your post processing work. Your aperture settings should be as wide as it can go. The aperture of f/2.8 is recommended. You will then need to change the ISO and exposure settings to get the best result. To get the right shot you need to ask yourself, how fast are the northern lights moving and how bright are they? When you have concluded that then:

  • Set your exposure time between 5 to 30 seconds. If the aurora moves quickly aim for around 5 to 10-second exposures. If it moving slowly use up to 25 to 30-second exposures.

  • Set the ISO at 400-800 and continue to increase your ISO until the picture is bright enough. ISO at 1.600 is often necessary to capture bright enough images.

Remember that photographing the Northern Lights takes practice and patient. Also, it can be very cold standing outside staring up the sky, so dress warmly and keep in mind that capturing the aurora can take time. It is also often very dark outside so a flashlight can be handy when handling your gear.

Conclusion

  • Look for the dark and clear sky in the area where there is some aurora activity.
  • Use a full frame camera and a wide angle lens.
  • Use a steady tripod.
  • Use the manual settings on your camera.
  • focus on infinity, or at a faraway horizon.
  • Set the aperture settings at f/2.8-f/4.
  • Set your exposure time between 5-25 seconds.
  • Set the ISO at 400 to 1600.
  • Make sure you have a full charged battery.
  • Dress warmly, It can be cold standing outside during winters.
  • The flashlight is good to have.
  1. HOW TO CAPTURE NORTHERN LIGHTS
  2. HOW TO CAPTURE NORTHERN LIGHTS
  3. HOW TO CAPTURE NORTHERN LIGHTS
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  9. Managing Director
  10. Managing Director
  11. Managing Director
  12. Managing Director
  13. Managing Director
  14. Managing Director
  15. Managing Director